The Federation of European Independent Financial Advisers

After the fun and festivities of March (or those that could be had in current circumstances) it’s time to get down to serious tax work in April. The tax forms and dates of submission have not, at the time of writing, but usually the forms are available around the second week of April. If this is your first year of declaring in France you will have to go to the tax office to get the paper forms to complete. After submitting your first paper return you should then be given details to allow you to log on to your online account and do future returns online. The paper returns you will need are usually the 2042, sometimes the 2042 pro if you have professional income, the 2047 for all foreign source income and the 3916 for bank accounts and assurance vies (section 7 of the form).

The 3916 has recently been amended to take into account the new information that needs to be declared. Make sure you tick box 8UU for bank accounts and 8TT on the 2042 form to flag the fact that you have foreign assurance vies.

Under Article 1649 AA of the French Tax Code, those tax payers who have foreign assurance vies must declare the policy number, the amount of the investment, the start date of the policy and the duration of the contract or investment, any top ups or payments or reimbursements of premiums made during the tax year and, if relevant, the amount of any withdrawals or the surrender value,

Article 344 C of the Tax Code has now added new requirements concerning the information for foreign assurance vie policies which are:

  • The identification of the policy holder: name, forename, address, date and place of birth,
  • the address of the head offices of the insurance company or similar institution and, if relevant, the subsidiary which grants the cover,
  • the person covered by the policy, its reference numbers, the nature of the risks covered,
  • the amount covered by the policy and the duration of this cover,
  • the dates of any amendments to the contract, total or partial withdrawals, which have taken place during the calendar year.

Our policy providers are aware of this new law and will send out the relevant information for you to add into your tax returns or attach as a document online.

Those who have regular at home services and pay via CESU usually receive a tax credit for these expenses, 60% of which is paid in January. From June 2021 the tax office will be trialling a new system of immediately paying the tax credit for home help for those employers in Paris and the Northern departments who use the CESU system, before progressively rolling out this system across the whole country in 2022.

According to a study from the US bureau of Labor Statistics in 2015 which looked at the number of jobs a person held between the ages of 18 and 50, the average person will have had 12 jobs. This is during a span of 32 years, so therefore the the number is likely to be higher for a person’s entire lifetime. This means that you are likely to have several pensions with several pension providers without knowing the value, investment strategy, performance or fees on these investments.

France has clearly realised this situation as well. Retirement plans for French companies are held by insurance companies, so when you leave the company you may not continue to receive information on what rights you have accrued. Now, thanks to new legislation, insurers must send the information on file to a centralised body. If you are or have been an employee in France you can go to the website info-retraite.fr to be informed of what rights you may have.

The new law also requires employers to communicate a statement of the retirement products to those leaving the company. When I left my job in Paris I had a PEE (Plan d’Epargne Entreprise or company savings policy) which I had done nothing with. I was advised that as I was no longer an employee of the company this was just being eaten up by fees. I closed it down and reinvested the money into two assurance vies for my sons which are now growing nicely.

The Spectrum IFA group offer a free review of your pensions. We will help you obtain the relevant information from your pension providers and prepare a free report on your current pension plans and their benefits and whether they can or should be combined into one self investment pension plan or qualified overseas pension scheme. As I often say to clients, I agree with the many eggs in baskets principle but it is better having your baskets on a shelf where you can see them rather than eggs hidden around the farm!

If you have an SCI remember to put the 4th May in your diary (may the fourth be with you!) as this is the deadline for the income tax return for SCI companies that are not subject to corporation tax. This is also the deadline for accountants to file the income statements for those with industrial and commercial businesses (BIC), non commercial businesses (BNC) and agricultural businesses (BA). The deadline is extended to 19th May for online declarations. As yet the other tax filing deadlines are not known.

In the finance law for 2020 (article 154) a new law allowed the tax and customs authorities to use certain data published on the internet (Law no 2019-1479 of 28.12.19). The decree implementing this data mining provision was published in the Official Law Journal on 13 February 2021 (no 2021-148 of 11.02.21). This means that the tax authorities are allowed, experimentally and for only three years, to use information published by tax payers on social media (Facebook, Instrgam etc), sales sites (Ebay, Leboncoin etc) and other networking sites such as Airbnb and Blablacar.

After researching, analysing and modelling fraudulent behaviour, the tax authorities can then use this data. They do not however have unlimited power, they are subject to the CNIL (National Commission for Freedom and Information Technology) and Parliament, to whom a report must be submitted in August 2022 and August 2023. The data mining can only be used to track non disclosed business activities and false declarations of off shore domiciles. Only “deliberately divulged” information can be collected and used, access to which does not require a password or subscribing to the website. Private posts or comments from third parties cannot be used. The data must be erased after 30 days if it isn’t going to result in an investigation.

Data on sensitive subjects such as political views, religious beliefs and health information must be erased after 5 days on the same grounds. Whether this experiment will be extended or not remains to be seen but in the meantime it is another reason to be careful what you put out on publicly accessible social media.

The above article was kindly provided by Katriona Murray-Platon from The Spectrum IFA Group and originally posted at: https://www.spectrum-ifa.com/big-brother-is-watching-or-might-be/